P.R.P.
Platelet-Rich Plasma
What is called "PRP" is a particular technique that consists in taking 15 ml of the patient's blood with a single syringe under the same conditions as a normal blood test. The blood sample is then centrifuged for 5 minutes at 1,500 rpm, allowing the separation of the different components of the blood, leaving only 5 ml of plasma and platelets. 
What is called "PRP" is a particular technique that consists in taking 15 ml of the patient's blood with a single syringe under the same conditions as a normal blood test. The blood sample is then centrifuged for 5 minutes at 1,500 rpm, allowing the separation of the different components of the blood, leaving only 5 ml of plasma and platelets. 
The resulting platelet-rich plasma is then injected into the injured area, a joint or tendon—or subcutaneously into the skull and face in order to repair tissue and relieve pain. The growth factors released in large numbers by the platelets stimulate local stem cells, which allow the healing of injured tissue and reduce inflammation and bleeding. Blood platelets, called thrombocytes, are nucleus-less cells formed in the bone marrow. They play an essential role in coagulation because they form aggregates that will create a real plug at the level of a wound just after it occurs (compression accentuates the achievement of hemostasis) before the other factors of blood coagulation come to a stop. PRP thus plays an important role in hemostasis and inflammation treatment in sports injuries and osteoarticular problems such as tendonitis of the shoulder (rotator cuff), elbow (epicondylitis or epitrochleitis), Achilles, hip or knee (patellar or quadricipital), plantar fasciitis, acute or chronic muscle injuries, ligament injuries (sprains), articular cartilage injuries or chondropathy, meniscus injuries, and osteoarthritis.
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Knowing that PRP has been used for many years in burn victims, it is now a popular treatment in aesthetics to improve skin (dull skin, sun and tobacco wrinkled skin, scars) and promote hair growth (hair density and alopecia). Platelet-rich plasma, injected into the face or scalp in the form of multiple micro-injections, will boost the synthesis of collagen and elastin, which naturally decrease with age. After injection, the platelets release their growth factors, which stimulate the cells of the dermis (fibroblasts) or the hair follicles of the scalp. The only contraindications are NSAIDs, blood-thinning treatments, fever, allergies, and pregnancy.

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